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Lean, Kanban, Agile Pairing, TDD (sometimes test after) software architect and programmer. Worked with distributed (called cloud sometimes) computing services since 2007 using phat data (8 billion rows of data on an AVERAGE day, sometimes called big data) and everything from business intelligence to the nitty gritty of array structures inside file based data stores to create caching tiers for custom software needs. Currently pushing for distributed technologies & improving software architecture, better data centers, the best software development practices and keeping everything secure in the financial industry again. To see what I'm up to today, check out my blog at Composite Code.

2 responses to “Cloud Failure, FUD, and The Whole AWS Oatage…”

  1. Ralph Windsor

    Adron, I wrote an article for our blog that warned of the risks of this type of incident and the implications for end users well before it occurred (and I’m sure I wasn’t the only one to make this observation). Whether it is well written or not is for others to judge: http://damblog.daydream.co.uk/cloud-dam/wikileaks-the-financial-crisis-lessons-for-managing-risk-with-cloud-hosted-dam/

    The real issue for the IT industry to get to grips with is the FUD from Cloud haters on the one hand and the over-exuberance of the Cloud industry on the other.

    A lot of people, especially less technically sophisticated managers who have to make final purchasing decisions, have the expectation that all Cloud services have built in redundancy and automated failover & redundancy as a standard feature (or even that it just doesn’t ever fail). When these expectations don’t bear up to the reality, it does real damage to the trust implicit in Cloud hosting.

  2. Adron

    Yeah. The expectations of what one gets with cloud computing is confusing, throw in “private” clouds with the “public” clouds, along with the variances in SLAs, technology, and a host of other things and there is no end in sight to the confusion these days. I do hope it improves, that some standard ideas can be put into place that are open, clear, and well defined. I’ve got my fingers crossed. ;)

    Thanks for reading Ralph!