Internet Entrepreneur, Co-Founder of Fiddme Ltd. With over 10 years of experience developing products on a wide variety of technologies, Eran has a wide experience in software development, managing and leading software projects from the ground up and driving innovation within large companies. Eran currently focuses on his startup company (www.fiddme.com) and providing consulting services to startups and companies.

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16 responses to “Google Chrome is a Failure… Surprised?”

  1. Google Chrome is a Failure… Surprised? | DeveloperZen

    [..] Google Chrome is a Failure… Surprised? | CloudAveon [..]

  2. jpugh

    Google did exactly what they wanted. Even today they continue to get press from their release. Take the time to understand their model, they keep items in beta for protection. Chrome is being worked and re-worked and will soon be seen again. They don’t lose interest, they watch how their tools are used and improve the ones that are 1)strategic or 2)have interest.

  3. Rod Drury

    I think you’re calling that a bit early.

    The significant release of Chrome will be the linux version.

    http://blog.xero.com/2008/09/the-significance-of-chrome

    Chrome will have another little spurt when the Mac version is released. Anyone have an update on that?

  4. Ben Kepes

    Eran – I have to agree with @jpugh and @Rod – Chrome is very much a "proof-of-concept" release, designed to get people thinking about where the future of the browser lies. Both Rod and I commented on the potential that Chrome opens up here. Really the introduction of Chrome was in part a prod to the other browser developers to move in this direction. Google believes that the "browser is the platform" – whose browser is of secondary importance (a close second but second nonetheless)

  5. Krishnan Subramanian

    I agree with Ben too. I am willing to wait some more time for it to mature. Didn’t we wait for more than half a decade before we saw any improvement in IE? Building Javascript engine from ground up is a very good first step. Once they bring in the plugin architecture, it will pick up steam. In fact, I am sticking to firefox right now because I am used to some of the plugins in firefox. Otherwise, I would have moved to Google Chrome. Either way Firefox and Google Chrome is responsible for the success of Web 2.0 and beyond. Compared to what Microsoft has done on the browser front, Mozilla and Google are doing a better job.

  6. arvi

    Though Chrome is faster, I’m forced to stick with Firefox 3 as many of the web apps I regularly use don’t function fully well in Chrome.

  7. BlueCirclet

    Many people Tried Google Chrome, It looks good is[...]

  8. Eran Kampf

    If There Anything Original in Google Chrome?
    (http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/blog/2008/sep/02/isthereanythingoriginalin)

    I wish I read the above post while I was writing this one…

    @Ben, @Krishnan, @Rob, @jpugh – you’re all basically saying that Chrome is a POC released to get us all thinking about the future of browsers. My question is, whats in Chrome that makes you think about future capabilities that isn’t in FF, Safari, etc.? All its “features” are already with us for a while. The future is V8? I’d like to think there’s more waiting for us in the future than just faster Javascript….

  9. Krishnan Subramanian

    Eran, when you have time, read Chris Messina’s post after chrome release (http://factoryjoe.com/blog/2008/09/01/google-chrome-and-the-future-of-browsers/) and his rant about Mozilla well before that (http://factoryjoe.com/blog/2007/05/10/thoughts-on-mozilla/).

  10. Eran Kampf

    Hi Krishnan,
    Thanks for the links.
    As for Chris’s post about Chrome, after the first few paragraph just ranting about Mozilla folks etc. we finally get to the point:
    “it’s practically a declaration of independence from the yesteryear traditions of browser design of the past 10 years”.

    Woa!? How come?

    “With Chrome, the web starts to look more like a nodal grid of documents, with cloud applications running on momentary instances”

    Getting closer…

    “We get Gears baked in (note the lack of “Google” prefix — it’s now simply “of the web”)”

    Jackpot! So its he’s excited about Gears, available for most browsers, and not Chrome?

    There are companies doing innovative stuff regarding the future of the web, including Google – Adobe with Flex\Air, Microsoft with Silverlight (and hopefully Live Mesh), Google (with Gears, its online services, V8?) and more…

    I just dont feel like Chrome is part of this innovation. Just a “me too” PR project..

    Regards,
    Eran

  11. Zoli Erdos

    Eran, Krishnan,

    This has all the makings of a good debate – why bury it in comments? This would merit another post, perhaps in a point / counterpoint format.

  12. Krishnan Subramanian

    Zoli, I have already thought about it and started writing yesterday itself. It will be up in a few moments.

  13. patrick

    I hesitate to use even upgraded versions of Chrome, since my last experience using it (first version) left my computer compromised; have they fixed the security issues beyond all doubt?

  14. brelson.com » 2008 - the year Google jumped the shark?

    [..] Google Chrome [..]

  15. A Year’s Worth of Popular Posts | DeveloperZen

    [..] – Originally published onCloud Avenueand triggered an interesting [..]

  16. CraigALance

    I’ve been trying to use Chrome and have been totally frustrated. For example, when I use to address http://imdb.com/ it reports DNS error. IE finds it. I try to report it, but their bug reporting page asks to resort to a menu that doesn’t exist.

    I think this product is flawed. It’s fast for some Web sites, but they do not have any way to report bugs…real bugs, like your browser doesn’t actually work. Should I use IE to report Chrome bugs?

    This is so frustrating that I will not revisit Chrome for a while.

    Sincerely Yours,

    -=- Craig A. Lance