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Director, OpenShift Strategy at Red Hat. Founder of Rishidot Research, a research community focused on services world. His focus is on Platform Services, Infrastructure and the role of Open Source in the services era. Krish has been writing @ CloudAve from its inception and had also been part of GigaOm Pro Analyst Group. The opinions expressed here are his own and are neither representative of his employer, Red Hat, nor CloudAve, nor its sponsors.

6 responses to “Cloud Computing and Developing Countries – Part 1”

  1. When Clouds Form In US, It Rains In Ethiopia | CloudAve

    [..] Here, at Cloud Ave, we have been emphasizing about how Cloud Computing levels the playing field for people across all sizes of businesses, across countries and in places where computing was an unknown term till recently. In my early days at Cloud Ave, I also wrote atwo [..]

  2. mufasa

    Yes to a certain degree, but we should also take into consideration things like internet access and bandwidth. In most developing countries these infrastructures are not available and only for a certain category of people. So is the playing level not at the moment till all these things have been resolve (internet access and energy). There can be multiple clouds but what use are they if you cannot access them?

    regards

  3. birodh

    while going thru your post i found that you are emphasizing on the opportunity for developers of developing countries. I agree on this but one thing that always remains is that the whole IT infrastructure owner are the same old IT bigwig like Microsoft, Google, IBM, Amazon. Individual developers can get benefited developing application in the cloud but the small companies will suppressed. There will no be the space to play for local companies. The cloud service provider may provide services in more cheaper, better and secure way but always there exists the risk of logical data lock. If the cloud provider can provide many of the services free of cost that may benefited the general but again that will sweep away the job of local companies. The local IT infrastructure and services enterprises will be closed. This will have big impact in Developing Countries.

  4. birodh

    while going thru your post i found that you are emphasizing on the opportunity for developers of developing countries. I agree on this but one thing that always remains is that the whole IT infrastructure owner are the same old IT bigwig like Microsoft, Google, IBM, Amazon. Individual developers can get benefited developing application in the cloud but the small companies will suppressed. There will no be the space to play for local companies. The cloud service provider may provide services in more cheaper, better and secure way but always there exists the risk of logical data lock. If the cloud provider can provide many of the services free of cost that may benefited the general but again that will sweep away the job of local companies. The local IT infrastructure and services enterprises will be closed. This will have big impact in Developing Countries.

  5. Greg Gillespie

    Mufasa raises a vaild point when it comes to the Cloud and Developing countries. Without broadband access the ability to make use of the Cloud is at best a limited one.

    What ways are we going to be able to decentralize Internet access itself?

    How to make the infrastructures of Cloud access more like the Cloud itself must also be part of the future picture, if there will be equal opportunity for all, regardless one’s home address.

  6. What is the Value of the Cloud for CSOs in the Developing World? « GuideStar International's Blog

    [...] despite the absence of sufficient infrastructure.  Wilfred Mworia, a young engineering student created an application for the iPhone that shows where events in Nairobi, Kenya are happening while also allowing others to add further [...]